Sue Scheff: Should your Teen Get a Summer Job?

By Education.com www.education.com

Last summer your teenager lazed around the pool complaining he was bored. This summer, though, he’s old enough to get a job. So should you send him to the nearest fast-food place to make him earn his keep? Before uttering an unequivocal and enthusiastic “yes!” take a little time to sit down with your teen and discuss the long-term effects of how he chooses to spend his summer.

There are certainly benefits to your teen getting a summer job. When she’s bringing home some money, she can start paying some of her own expenses. She’ll be occupied, less likely to get into trouble and won’t be complaining that she’s bored. But did you know that getting a job, even as early as the summer after her freshman year, can make her more attractive to colleges, too?

“Colleges want students to use their free time wisely and well,” states Lisa Sohmer, a member of the National Association for College Admission Counseling’s Board of Directors. “Students can have summer jobs to earn money, but they can earn –and learn – other things as well, such as maturity and responsibility.”  That sense of responsibility may catch a college’s attention, but the type of work a student does will keep it.  According to Elizabeth Wissner-Gross, author of What High Schools Don’t Tell You: 300+ Secrets to Make Your Kid Irresistible to Colleges by Senior Year, it’s not enough to get a job at the local pizza place.”Ideally,” she says, “the student’s work experience should help further the student’s interests and academic passions.” In other words, the teen who aspires to be a doctor should be working in a hospital or research facility this summer instead of flipping burgers.

Click here for entire article: http://www.education.com/magazine/article/Teen_Summer_Job/

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